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Patient Focus Award

Highly Commended

Follow-up to Success – A retraining programme for Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

Baxter Healthcare Ltd


Summary of work

Traditionally, patient education in Peritoneal Dialysis (PD) is carried out during an initial training period, with the goal of teaching the proper methods for managing dialysis at home. Compliance of the patient and the prescribed treatment is crucial for the prevention of complications, including infection, which is one of the major causes of transferring from PD to Haemodialysis (HD).  

Since 2006, 600 patients from 15 different referring hospitals have been trained thanks to a programme delivered by four qualified renal trained nurses from an independent purpose-built patient education and training centre. In September 2009, Unit A had a 46 per cent transfer rate from PD; of these, three transferred from PD in the first 90 days. PD patient numbers within the unit were also slowly decreasing.

The centre instigated follow-up training days for patients 6-8 weeks after starting therapy. Between September 2009 and September 2010, the centre held six follow up training days: 55 per cent of patients trained for Unit A attended and the transfer to HD reduced by 8 per cent to 38 per cent in one year and none transferred from PD in the first 90 days.

A second Unit (B) found that its transfer from PD in September 2009 was 61 per cent and that its patient numbers were static. The model has since been adopted and adapted for another unit where transfer from PD to HD was 61 per cent in September 2009. Follow-up training resulted in a 7 per cent fall in transfers and growth in patient numbers. In 2009 the 90-day transfer from PD was 7 and in 2010 it was zero. They continue to run successful follow up training days for all new patients that have been trained PD.

Judges comments

“A novel approach that showed real patient insight and significant improvements in patient outcomes. It is the first programme to put patients into groups for training. Group training is a very effective way of helping patients cope with chronic conditions – in terms of what it delivers, it is great. It was an established service and they refocused it, turning their attention to training.”