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Apple launches Watch-powered atrial fibrillation study

The firm's Apple Heart Study app will see it collaborate with Stanford Medicine

Apple Watch

Apple is collaborating with Stanford Medicine on a study that uses the tech firm’s smartwatch to monitor for atrial fibrillation.

The first-of-its-kind project will see the Apple Watch’s heart rate sensor used to collect heart data, with participants found to have an irregular rhythm offered a free consultation with a study doctor and an electrocardiogram (ECG) patch for additional monitoring.

Jeff Williams, Apple’s COO, said: “Every week we receive incredible customer letters about how Apple Watch has affected their lives, including learning that they have AFib. These stories inspire us and we're determined to do more to help people understand their health.

“Working alongside the medical community, not only can we inform people of certain health conditions, we also hope to advance discoveries in heart science.”

The Apple Heart Study app is available in the US App Store to adults who have an Apple Watch Series 1 or later and who are aged 22 or older.

Meanwhile, Apple is reportedly working on more advanced heart-monitoring features for future versions of the smartwatch that could see it incorporate EKG functionality.

9th January 2018

From: Research

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