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GSK appoints rare diseases research head

Birgitte Volck moves to the company from Swedish Ophan Biovitrum

GSK Sobi Birgitte VolckGlaxoSmithKline has appointed Birgitte Volck has its new head of rare diseases R&D.

She will join GSK after working her six months notice at Swedish Ophan Biovitrum (Sobi), which she joined four years ago and where she served as its chief medical officer.

Sobi's president and CEO Geoffrey McDonough said: "We thank Birgitte for her leadership and dedication which has helped to evolve Sobi's patient oriented research and development organisation into a highly skilled international team.

"Birgitte joined Sobi in 2012 and has been instrumental in advancing Sobi's late stage development projects and in bringing new treatment options to people with rare diseases."

Prior to joining Stockholm-based Sobi Volck spent five years at Amgen, where she served as executive development director, bone, neuroscience and inflammation, international R&D.

Before Amgen she held positions with Genzyme as Nordic medical director and project director and at Denmark's Pharmexa as vice president, clinical development and medical affairs.

15th January 2016

From: Research

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