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Amgen and Takeda lung drug fails trial

Amgen and Takeda have revealed that its lung cancer drug motesanib has failed to meet its endpoint in a phase III trial
Amgen and Takeda have revealed that its lung cancer drug motesanib has failed to meet its endpoint in a phase III trial. 

The drug failed to demonstrate an improvement in overall survival rate when combined with paclitaxel and carboplatin in 1,090 patients with advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer.

In this trial, as in earlier trials of motesanib, the patients who received the drug were also more likely to experience serious adverse events more frequently than those who were given a placebo. Among the adverse events reported were hypertension and bleeding disorders.

Roger M Perlmutter, executive vice president of research and development at Amgen, said: "We are disappointed with the results from this trial, but look forward to further analysis of the data which may ultimately help inform future research in this area."

No decision has been made about continuing development.

31st March 2011

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