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Clinical trial initiations hit a record high

The number of new clinical trial initiations, or starts, rose by 12 per cent in 2007 with 662 commercial Investigational New Drug applications submitted by the biopharmaceutical industry
The number of new clinical trial initiations, or starts, rose by 12 per cent in 2007 with 662 commercial Investigational New Drug (IND) applications submitted by the biopharmaceutical industry.

The figures, published by global biopharmaceutical services organisation Parexel, also show that the pattern of IND submissions for therapeutic biological products are less consistent than those for drug products.

Parexel's data show that the number of clinical studies of oncology drugs rose by 13 per cent in 2007, while clinical trials for neurology compounds increased by 45 per cent.

"The number of commercial IND submissions is a key measure of the number of clinical studies that are initiated by biopharmaceutical companies. IND submissions have been steadily increasing from 2004 to 2007, from 542 to 662 submissions, representing a 22 per cent increase over this three year time period," said Mark Mathieu, director of publications at Parexel.

An indicator of overall clinical research activity is the number of active commercial INDs at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER). Parexel's analysis showed that at the end of 2007, this figure stood at 5,417 - a decrease of half a per cent since 2006.

23rd June 2008

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