Doctor’s social network Sermo expands into Canada

Builds on the medical crowdsourcing phenomenon in health

Digital doctors 

The social network for doctors Sermo has expanded further outside of the US and UK by opening its doors to Canada's 77,000 doctors. 

The Canadian expansion follows Sermo's international UK launch in April. 

The network said it also has plans to roll out in Australia, Ireland, New Zealand and South Africa in the coming weeks.

Sermo is designed to be a “virtual doctors' lounge” - forming part of a teaching hospital and international medical conference in one place.  

Doctors can then gather on this online meeting place to discuss medical innovation and virtual learning.

This forms part of a branch of 'medical crowdsourcing' - a new healthcare phenomenon that enables doctors to pool their collective wisdom online to solve patient cases. 

Sermo said in a statement that the “appetite for international collaboration is ripe”, as demonstrated by its own poll showing 85% of international doctors want to join the social network, which first started in the US a decade ago. 

This also comes after a 2014 National Physician Survey showed that 77% still aren't actively using social networks professionally, despite the Canadian Medical Protective Association publishing social network guidelines for doctors last year.

Dr David Schindler, a Canadian doctor, said: “Medical knowledge can be very isolating. Yes, medical breakthroughs happen every day, but that doesn't mean every doctor has access to these innovations. I think Sermo can change that. 

“With a click of a button, doctors can tap the wisdom and experience of thousands of doctors. There's comfort in seeking a second opinion from your peers when you're faced with a tough medical decision. No one likes making decisions alone – especially when a patient's life is on the line.”

Sermo CEO Peter Kirk, added: “Practicing medicine in today's fast-paced world is extremely complex and having a direct line to other experts for tough patient cases is an important resource. 

“Canada has a conservative perception towards social networks but now, with a secure and anonymous physician-only network, Canadian doctors have a place to practice 'safe social' and connect with each other and international colleagues.”

Article by
Ben Adams

3rd July 2015

From: Healthcare

Article by
Ben Adams

3rd July 2015

From: Healthcare

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