Please login to the form below

Not currently logged in
Email:
Password:

Novartis raises pressure in Pfizer’s Ibrance with new Kisqali data

Women on Kisqali were found to have a longer PFS than those on hormonal therapy alone

Novartis

New phase III data for Novartis’ CDK4/6 inhibitor Kisqali has shown that the drug is effective in tackling breast cancer in younger women.

The MONALEESA-7 trial in pre-menopausal women with hormone-receptor positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer is the first dedicated study to show a benefit for a CDK4/6 blocker in these patients - giving Novartis a boost as it plays catch-up in the market with Pfizer’s first-to-market Ibrance (palbociclib).

In the study, women taking Kisqali (ribociclib) on top of hormonal therapy as a first-line intervention had a longer progression-free survival (PFS) than those on hormonal therapy alone, said Novartis, which is planning to unveil the data at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) in December.

“There remains a significant unmet treatment need in younger women diagnosed with premenopausal advanced breast cancer, as the disease tends to be more aggressive with a poorer prognosis,” commented Samit Hirawat, head of global drug development at Novartis’ oncology unit.

Kisqali was approved earlier this year as a first-line therapy for post-menopausal women with HR-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer based on the results of the MONALEESA-2 study and has been predicted to become a blockbuster for Novartis with sales of $1.2bn, but has a long way to go.

Novartis’ drug made sales of $26m in the third quarter - with a full US launch only taking place in August - while Ibrance brought in $878m for Pfizer, a rise of 60%. Ibrance has been on the market since 2015.

EvaluatePharma thinks Ibrance will become a mega-blockbuster with sales of $6bn-plus in 2022, with Kisqali and other rivals jostling for a distant second place although patients will benefit from greater choice - particularly with regard to toxicity profiles - and potentially lower prices.

Novartis is currently a little ahead of Eli Lilly, whose CDK4/6 inhibitor Verzenio (abemaciclib) was approved in the US, its first market, in September.

Lilly has one leg-up over its rivals, gaining approval as a third-line therapy for women with HR-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer who have received prior hormonal therapy and chemotherapy, which was highlighted by the FDA as a reason for its earlier-than-expected approval.

Article by
Phil Taylor

9th November 2017

From: Research

Share

Tags

Featured jobs

Subscribe to our email news alerts

PMHub

Add my company
Atlantis Healthcare

Atlantis Healthcare is a global leader in optimising patient self-management. Established in 1996, we design, develop and implement scalable solutions...

Latest intelligence

AstraZeneca’s oncology renaissance
Susan Galbraith played a key role in restoring AstraZeneca’s place in cancer drug development – she talks about the future of oncology and why there’s more to be done to...
Navigating the antibiotic resistance crisis
Blue Latitude Health speaks to Tara DeBoer, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher and CEO of BioAmp Diagnostics to explore the antimicrobial resistance crisis, and learn how a simple tool could support physicians...
Combined immunotherapies – potential and pitfalls
‘Combining therapeutic compounds is the first logical step towards better results, namely higher rates of patients responding to treatment, with deeper and more sustained responses’...

Infographics