Please login to the form below

Not currently logged in
Email:
Password:

Prostate cancer deaths double in men with faulty gene

Rencently published findings show that men with prostate cancer caused by a faulty BRCA2 gene are twice as likely to die from the disease as men with a faulty BRCA1 gene

Cancer Research UK has published findings which show that men with prostate cancer caused by a faulty BRCA2 gene are twice as likely to die from the disease as men with a faulty BRCA1 gene.

Prostate cancer takes the lives of around 10,000 men in the UK each year. With around 35,000 new cases diagnosed each year, and a one in 14 lifetime risk of developing it, prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK.

Dr Lesley Walker, director of cancer information at Cancer Research UK, said: "Although only a very small percentage of men with prostate cancer will carry a faulty BRCA2 gene, they're much more likely to die from the disease. It's important that more research is done in this area to ensure that this group is targeted effectively so cancer is picked up at an early stage and, more importantly, that they are given the most appropriate treatment."

Results from previous studies have shown that men with a faulty BRCA2 gene can be up to five times more likely than the general population to develop prostate cancer. Dr Steven Narod, the lead researcher, said that the new findings are important, as men with a faulty BRCA2 gene are not responding well to current treatments.

25th June 2008

Share

Featured jobs

Subscribe to our email news alerts

PMHub

Add my company
M&F Health

M&F Health is a full service communications agency, dedicated to the health and wellbeing sector. We are an independent amongst...

Latest intelligence

Products come and go, but a pharma company’s most valuable, durable asset is its reputation, writes Duncan Mackenzie-Reid and Simon Grist
...
Erik
A quest for innovative solutions
UCB looks to the future through a PRISM...
Big data, privacy and the rise of genomic testing
Blue Latitude Health speaks to Johan Christiaanse, Marketing Director at BGI, to find out how the medical profession can overcome one of the major barriers to precision medicine – big...

Infographics