The Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain has hit back at an article in the British Medical Journal and said that it supports pharmacists who supply over-the-counter medicines to patients" /> The Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain has hit back at an article in the British Medical Journal and said that it supports pharmacists who supply over-the-counter medicines to patients" />

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RPSGB hits back at BMJ article

The Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain has hit back at an article in the British Medical Journal and said that it supports pharmacists who supply over-the-counter medicines to patients

The Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain (RPSGB) has hit back at an article in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) and said that it supports pharmacists who supply over-the-counter (OTC) medicines to patients.

Regulations for access to OTC medicines were called into question by the article, in particular the ease of which they can be purchased via the internet. An all-party parliamentary group in England is currently assessing whether or not there should be a ban on the sale of OTC medicines. The article published by the BMJ outlined the requirement for more evidence to support the sale of OTC drugs.

David Pruce, director of price and quality improvement for the RPSGB, said: "The society is in support of increasing the public's access to OTC medicines when supplied under the supervision of a pharmacist. Pharmacists are experts in medicines and are well placed at the heath of communities."

"They will refer patients to their doctor if they think that they have a condition that warrants further investigation or requires treatment with a prescription-only medicine," he added.

The RPSGB advised anyone with concerns about their medicines to speak to their community pharmacist and, if purchasing online, take certain precautionary steps. Patients should check the pharmacist is registered and avoid any websites offering to sell prescription-only medicines without a written prescription from a doctor.

31st March 2008

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