Please login to the form below

Alzheimer’s disease: reviewing the immediate treatment horizon

Account Manager Stuart Goodman takes a look at some of the promising categories of Phase 3 treatments that could soon be available to patients with Alzheimer's disease.
With a current market valuation at $6.5 billion, and a projected direct medical cost of $1.1 trillion by 2050, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an area of huge unmet need.¹ There is enormous commercial potential for pharmaceutical companies to address the challenge of AD sooner rather than later, and we see many contenders racing to be the first to do so.Unfortunately, the complexity of the disease has meant that many recent AD trials have been unsuccessful.

However, the learnings from these ‘failures’ have paved the way for the robust pipeline of treatments that could potentially be coming to market in the next five years.

A recent article by BLH Consultant David Cooney explored the bleak history of Alzheimer’s disease trial failures since the turn of the century. In it, he highlighted how, despite continued investment by pharmaceutical companies into AD treatment research, AD sufferers still only have 5 FDA-approved treatments to choose from, and even these are only capable of slowing the progression of disease symptoms.

However, every trial that has been unsuccessful has been a guiding hand to the scientific community, allowing those working extensively in the disease area to progress our understanding and develop new molecules for application in new trials and investigations. In this article, Account Manager Stuart Goodman takes a look at some of the promising categories of Phase 3 treatments that could soon be available to patients with AD.

The continued focus on a beta-amyloid solution 

Whilst there is increasing evidence that AD is a complex and multi-factorial disease, many scientists continue to believe that beta-amyloid (Aβ) is the main pathogenic factor responsible for the degenerative changes that occur in the brain during AD. Consequently, manipulating the amount of Aβ in the brain still represents one of the most attractive approaches for disease intervention in AD. We can see this reflected in the five-year Phase 3 pipeline, where Aβ immunotherapy drugs, small-molecule BACE inhibitors and anti-Aβ aggregation agents are all undergoing late stage testing.

Crenezumab, gantenerumab, and solanezumab are all involved in additional prospective longitudinal investigations – the Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative (Phase 2), the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network study (Phase 2/3), and the Anti-Amyloid Treatment in AD Prevention Trial (Phase 3) respectively. These investigations are ongoing, and will examine whether anti-amyloid drugs can prevent or delay disease onset in individuals with a high chance of developing AD (as determined by genetic predisposition or PET brain scans). They represent an important shift of research focus to earlier in the disease pathway, and will go a long way toward supporting or refuting the concept of the amyloid hypothesis. 

References:
  1.  Qian X, et al. Nature Reviews Drug Discovery. 2015;14:675-76.

Download the full article from Blue Latitude Health

1st September 2016

Share

Tags

Company Details

Blue Latitude Health

+44 203 328 1840

Contact Website

Address:
Blue Latitude Health (UK)
140 Aldersgate Street
London
EC1A 4HY
United Kingdom

Latest content on this profile

Empowered patients: shaking the foundations of healthcare
Precision medicine represents a new paradigm in healthcare.This new approach to treating and preventing disease views the patient holistically, analysing their genes, environment and lifestyle, and using this information to make a more accurate treatment decision. Here we discuss the barriers, opportunities and potential outcomes of the precision medicine era in healthcare.
Blue Latitude Health
A uniquely English genomic medicine service
The UK National Health Service is developing one standardised approach to embedding precision medicine across the whole of England. Blue Latitude Health speaks to Dr Tom Fowler, Deputy Chief Scientist and Director of Public Health at Genomics England, to find out how the NHS is achieving this goal.
Blue Latitude Health
Diagnosing the lag in neuropsychiatric treatments
The number of mental health research programmes in larger drug firms has shrunk by 70% in the past decade. Blue Latitude Health Senior Associate Consultant Sana Rahim explores this drop in investment and explains why developing a market-orientated model is vital for making progress.
Blue Latitude Health
Precision paediatrics: Treating patients with CAR-T
Dr Stuart Adams specialises in using T-cell therapy to treat paediatric patients at Great Ormond Street Hospital. Here, he explains what it was like to develop and deliver a groundbreaking CAR-T therapy for the first patient in Europe, and how the centre of excellence has adapted to make precision medicine a reality
Blue Latitude Health
What does it mean to be an agile organisation
We spoke with Philip Atkinson to learn how healthcare and pharmaceutical companies can rapidly respond to changes in the market.
Blue Latitude Health
Battling breast cancer with precision medicine (Part 2)
Dr Mark Moasser treated breast cancer survivor Laura Holmes-Haddad (interviewed in part one) with an innovative precision medicine, which at the time was yet to be approved. Here he gives his side of the story and explains how industry can help oncologists treat more patients with targeted therapies.
Blue Latitude Health