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Live panel discussion: Should diverse representation in UK clinical trials be mandatory?

This online event is being held by Innovative Trials, COUCH Health, and Egality Health.  Three organisations who are working to improve diversity in clinical trials.

Live panel discussion |  Tuesday 10 November 2020  |  12:30–14:00 GMT / 07:30–09:00 EST

Sign up to attend the discussion here: https://www.clinicaltrialdiversity.info/

In 2019, of the ~46,000 clinical research volunteers involved in clinical trials that resulted in novel drug approvals only 18% were Hispanic, 9% were African American, and 9% were Asian. Patient diversity is a problem that exists in clinical trials. Participants across all therapeutic areas have tended to be Caucasian and male.

There is a recognised need to challenge the disproportionate representation in research that affects population health. In the US, for example, the FDA is placing increasing pressure on pharma companies to run trials with patients who better resemble the overall population; a scramble is on to make trials more diverse.

The FDA guidance on patient diversity does not specifically dictate what companies should do to make their trials more diverse. However, it does state trials should recruit patients that represent the population that has the burden of disease in the real world.

Is it time for the UK to do the same?

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed persisting health inequalities in the UK, and the need for effective medical research that meets the needs of those most affected.  In the current climate in the UK, more than ever, there is an urgent need to tackle systemic inequalities and under-representation of cultures, races, nationalities across all segments of industry, and society as a whole.

Furthermore, given the steps the FDA has taken to address disproportionate representation in clinical trials in the US,  this event enables organsations involved to move ahead of the curve and foster an early discussion on this issue specifically within the UK context.

Sign up to attend the discussion here: https://www.clinicaltrialdiversity.info/

8th November 2020

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COUCH Health

+44 (0) 330 995 0656

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Address:
Suite 2.10, Jactin House
24 Hood Street
Manchester
M4 6WX
United Kingdom

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