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Communicating through video

It's likely that video is about to replace a lot of your face-to-face appointments.

It's likely that video is about to replace a lot of your face-to-face appointments. You already know how to present yourself for meetings, but we thought we would give a few tips on how to present yourself over film:

1. Use a tripod
Selfie-style videos are great for sending to friends and family but for a professional-looking video, using a tripod helps to keep the frame consistent and your camera steady.

2. Use the back camera
The back camera of your phone means that you won't be distracted by watching yourself on the screen, helping you to appear more alert and engaged with your audience.

3. Consider the background and lighting
It's important to think about what is visible in the background of your shot and the message that could give to your audience. Your video will also appear to be better quality if the subject is well lit.

4. Ensure good audio quality
Speaking clearly and projecting your voice will help you to sound confident, meaning that audiences are more likely to believe in what you're saying.

5. Have an idea of what you’re going to say
Knowing the key points you want to talk about in a video leads to less dead airtime and makes you sound more self-assured.

18th March 2020

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Company Details

Page & Page and Partners

+44 (0)20 8617 8250

Contact Website

Address:
The Ministry
79-81 Borough Road
London
SE1 1DN
United Kingdom

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