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Why are doctors frustrated with the digitalisation of healthcare?

In this article, Customer Experience Consultant Anna Tamasi from Blue Latitude Health highlights the most common usability and user experience implications that the digitalisation of healthcare poses on doctors professional lives.
Today, everything we do is done on a digital device; we attach devices to our bodies, we equip our homes with smart devices, we pay with our phones, we speak to our doctor over Skype, we diagnose ourselves using a mobile health app. When a new technology comes out, we simply adapt. And we can adapt because we have a choice about whether we’ll use it or not – there is no one making us use particular apps or devices.  

In healthcare, it’s different. It’s not a consumer-driven market where we can assume that patient-centred innovations will automatically influence adoption within doctor communities. Pharma companies should consider the challenges doctors face with new technology if they want to make a positive impact on the lives of their customers.  

In this article, Customer Experience Consultant Anna Tamasi highlights the most common usability and user experience implications that the digitalisation of healthcare poses on doctors professional lives.
 

Processes that do not consider adoption models

With the low number of healthcare workers available for our growing needs, healthcare remains a suppliers' market where primary care computing suppliers have a significant effect on the delivery of information and information systems.  

We normally assume that doctors are happily using digital tools and willing to receive data feeds from their patients or engage with digital services. But for doctors to embrace new ways and new tools of clinical care, new technology implementations have to hold a clear value proposition.



Download the full article from Blue Latitude Health here

17th February 2016

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Blue Latitude Health

+44 203 328 1840

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Blue Latitude Health (UK)
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