Please login to the form below

Bridging the gender health gap: 9 key takeaways from Thrive’s webinar on tech and women's health

Unequal health outcomes have been a reality for women throughout the world for far too long. But change is finally happening.

Digital technology - apps, websites, online tools, mobile messaging - has the potential to bridge the gender health gap, to empower women with health information that’s tailored to their individual needs and lifestyles.

Early in February 2022, Thrive brought together some of the brightest global talent in femtech to discuss all things women’s health and the empowering potential of tech.

With a truly diverse range of voices and perspectives, the webinar offered unique insights from femtech industry leaders, explored the link between technology and health equity, looked at the topic of personalised health interventions.

Our speakers were:

  • Shirley Sylvester, Johnson & Johnson
  • Aditi Hazra-Ganju, Saathhealth
  • Rachel Misra, MSI Reproductive Choices
  • Kathrin Folkendt, Femtech Insider
  • Sandra Wirström, LEIA
  • Caitlin Dalton and Daphne Metland, Thrive

But don't worry if you missed it, you can watch the webinar until the end of April. Here's a quick summary too of the key takeaways.

Improving medical care alone cannot ensure better health outcomes for women

Women’s health outcomes are affected by a broad spectrum of factors, including their social and economic status and physical environment. For example, in some parts of the world women are nearly twice as likely as men to have low literacy levels and significantly less likely to use the internet. So it follows that the gender health gap can only be bridged by wider societal and cultural changes.

The inequalities women face are not equal

The gender gap is wider for some. The barriers faced by women in lower income countries, and by particular groups in higher income countries, including older women, women from minority ethnic groups, those from LGBTQ+ communities, and women living with disabilities, are complex and deep. In the UK black women are four times more likely to die in childbirth than white women. In the US they are two to three times more likely to die in pregnancy or due to a childbirth-related cause, regardless of education status.

The growth of women in tech is fuelling change

Historically, it was a field dominated by men, but it’s increasingly opening up to female entrepreneurs and digital specialists. This means products are being created that women really want and need.

Innovation also offers opportunities to women delivering healthcare

Women stand to benefit from digital solutions not just in terms of receiving but by delivering essential healthcare too. They are the backbone of the global health workforce. In India alone, they make up half of the total workforce.

There’s more to femtech than fertility

Digital solutions focused on reproductive health are common but there are a broader range of female-specific concerns and life stages that are relatively uncovered, including postpartum mental wellbeing and conditions like polycystic ovary syndrome and endometriosis.

To achieve success, it’s vital to get users involved

The co-creation process is vital to producing effective digital solutions. For example, the PM3 (Prevent Maternal Mortality Mobile) app was designed for and with Black women to help mothers manage their health after having a baby.

Effective digital solutions need to be engaging as well as advanced

Good design and original content bring depth to digital solutions. This means using videos, graphics and interactive quizzes in local languages, and giving women opportunities to adapt content according to their life stage and health history.

Digital platforms break barriers

Tech can empower women to get the information they need about taboo topics. In 2021, MSI Reproductive Choices had 2.7 million conversations about sexual and reproductive health, 42% of which came through social media. More than 3,000 users per month also engage with its digital contraception counsellor Choice.

Human interaction is part of the digital journey

Real-life touchpoints are essential. Digital tools can encourage and push women towards essential social support and community resources – and help women feel more confident in these interactions.

Thrive’s Digital opportunities for women’s wellbeing white paper further explores the barriers to truly closing the health gap and potential solutions in overcoming them. You can download it here.

And for every Thrive newsletter subscriber, the agency will make a donation to Period Poverty, a charity providing free period products to the growing number of homeless women in the UK, and to those living in refugee camps abroad. Once a month you’ll receive the latest news in health communication, insights into behaviour change campaigns, and tips to create compelling content.

You can also connect with the agency on LinkedIn or get in touch at info@thriveagency.uk

25th February 2022

Share

Tags

Company Details

Thrive Agency

07595 120243

Contact Website

Address:
Rouen House
Norwich
Norfolk
NR1 1RB
United Kingdom

Latest content on this profile

5 steps to health content accreditation success
Accreditation for health content is a major way to set yourselves apart from your competitors, win exposure and new clients - find out what we wish we'd known when we were applying!
Thrive Agency
Bridging the gender health gap: 9 key takeaways from Thrive’s webinar on tech and women's health
Unequal health outcomes have been a reality for women throughout the world for far too long. But change is finally happening.
Thrive Agency
Women’s 2021 health wins worth celebrating
Women’s health came under fresh scrutiny in 2021 as moves were made to close the gender health gap in the UK. But what were the key wins that have helped women? As specialists in women’s health and improving lives through empowering and accurate content, Thrive agency reflected on a year of progress.
Thrive Agency
How femtech is changing the future of women's health
The femtech industry has the potential to be the next stage of evolution in the open access movement. Taking on the role of a public library, which allows a wider section of society to access information, the mobile phone has become the place to access vital health information.
Thrive Agency